• Beachside factories in Gambia
    I am addressing you because of the fishmeal processing factories on Gambias coastline. Are you aware of this already? I think the world definitely should act against this exploitation of one of the last natural, not over-fished and paradise-like tourism coastlines. They are Chinese plants and they are based directly on the beachside to be able to pollute their waste directly and unseen inside the sea. Every now and then tons of dead fish are lying on the beach. This together with the very disgusting scent produced by it scares off tourists - in places called (not by circumstance) paradise beach. In a country where almost 90% lives from tourism. Moreover activists found out they use blind trollers. Therefore they are likely to catch more fish than they are allowed to. The standards on the ships are not made for humans. They don't employ any locals which already resulted in serious riots taking place. The government is protecting the Chinese companies. Eventhough nature reserves like the Tanji Bird Reserve are next to it. Everywhere else in the world all this couldn't happen like this. It is probably only possible due to corruption and is making one of the poorest countries even poorer in the long run. I really want to protect Gambia and its people from this exploitation and make the world know about it.
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    Created by Elena Speckels
  • Okavango Delta: Keep the oil industry out of Africa’s natural treasure!
    The Okavango Basin is an endorheic basin that covers an area of over 2.5 million km2 across Namibia, Angola and Botswana. The basin, which includes the Okavango Delta, is one of Africa’s most biodiverse habitats, home to a myriad of birds and megafauna species including the largest African elephant population left on the planet. The delta, a Ramsar and UNESCO World Heritage Site, remains one of the largest intact wetlands. Nearly one million people are dependent on the Okavango basin for their livelihoods. ReconAfrica’s license is completely within the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier area and overlaps with six locally managed wildlife reserves and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. African elephants, African wild dogs, lions, leopards, giraffes, birds and rare flora will be deleteriously affected by the project. Environmentalists point to the Niger Delta in Nigeria, where oil exploitation by Shell and other corporations has caused an ecological and social nightmare. This must not be repeated in Namibia and Botswana. Namibian and Botswana environmentalists anticipate the following impacts: 🐝 The region’s ecosystem will be destroyed by a Canadian company that will rake in 90% of the profits. 🐝 ReconAfrica’s project will lead us to burn through what little remains of the planet’s dwindling global carbon budget and hampers global efforts to move beyond fossil fuels. The company must not be allowed to destroy such a globally vital conservation area under the guise of economic development. 🐝 Oil and gas extraction is a menace to wildlife. Loud noises, human movement and vehicle traffic from drilling operations can disrupt avian species’ communication, breeding and nesting. 🐝 The infrastructure built for energy development can also have a negative impact: power lines, well pads, fences and roads fragment the habitats of many species. 🐝 The construction of roads, facilities and drilling sites known as well pads requires the use of heavy equipment and can destroy big chunks of pristine wilderness. 🐝 Such damage is often irreversible. 🐝 Transporting the oil rig will destroy local roads. How heavy oil and gas industry equipment has impacted road infrastructure and led to deadly accidents has been amply documented in other countries. 🐝 The region’s tourism industry will be shaken and thousands of people might not only lose their jobs, but their investments as well. Who would want to go on safari in a landscape littered with oil wells? 🐝 The project would deplete and pollute the region’s aquifer. How can one justify giving an overseas company unbridled access to the region’s most precious resource? 🐝 The project will worsen food insecurity in the region, as water is the life source of communities in the Okavango ecosystem.
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    Created by Fridays For Future Windhoek Picture
  • Désastre écologique dans le village Ngoura situé dans le département de la Kadey à l'Est du Cameroun
    nous les ami(e)s de la conservation de la nature , réunis au sein du groupe WhatsApp Moocs Gestion des aires protégées, venons auprès de vous, solliciter votre pétition pour le retrait du permis d'exploitation minière à la Société Chinoise qui exploite de l'or dans le village Ngoura du département de la Kadey, et qui est responsable du stress hydrique dans une zone déjà semi désertique, et de la mort de plusieurs espèces protégées qui font l'unicité faunique de notre pays. Dans l'attente d'une suite extrêmement favorable, nous vous prions de bien vouloir réagir de manière urgente pour éviter la catastrophe écologique qui s'annonce , et donc les populations locales ont droits à l'eau une ressource en eau de bonne qualité.
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  • Protégeons la biodiversité !!!
    D’après la page Facebook « Alertes environnementales au Sénégal », l’absence de l’homme sur certaines plages avec la pandémie du Covid-19 a entrainé le retour des tortures Caouannes au niveau des côtes sénégalaises au bonheur des braconniers et au malheur de la biodiversité car l’espèce joue un rôle important dans l’équilibre des écosystèmes marins. Notre caractère anthropocentrique nous pousse à négliger certaines espèces tout en oubliant que tout est lié dans la nature, aucune espèce ne peut être considérée comme non indispensable. Conscient de l’importance de la tortue Caouanne et de sa faible reproduction dans le temps et dans l’espace, il serait urgent de mettre en place une stratégie pour accueillir et protéger dans nos côtes la tortue Caouanne (ressource biologique partagée) à notre qualité de « Téranga sénégalais » (hospitalité). Sauvons la Tortue Caouanne, pour participer à la conservation des espèces animales indispensables à l’équilibre des écosystèmes marins en cette journée internationale de l’environnement dont le thème est « La biodiversité une source de préoccupation à la fois urgente et existentielle ».Les événements récents comme les feux de brousse au Brésil, aux Etats -Unis et en Australie ou les infections de criquets en Afrique de l’Est, et maintenant, une pandémie mondiale, démontrent l’interdépendance des êtres humains et des réseaux de vie dans lesquels ils vivent. La nature nous envoie un message (http://www.worldenvironnementday.gobal/). According to the Facebook page “Alertes Environnementales au Senegal”, the absence of man on certain beaches brought about by the Covid-19 has led to the return of Loggerhead Turtles to the coast of Senegal to the happiness of poachers and the misfortune of biodiversity because the species plays a key role in balancing marine ecosystems. Our anthropocentric nature urges us to overlook some species while forgetting that everything is connected when it comes to deal with nature, no species indeed can be considered apart. Aware of the importance of the Loggerhead Turtle and of its low reproduction in time and space, it would be urgent to implement a strategy to welcome and protect in our coasts the Loggerhead Turtle (shared biological resource) on behalf of our quality "Senegalese Teranga" (hospitality). Save the Loggerhead Turtle, to be instrumental in the conservation of animal species overriding to the balance of marine ecosystems on this International Environment Day, the theme of which is "Biodiversity, a source of both urgent and existential concern". Recent events like bush fires in Brazil, the United States and Australia or locust invasions in East Africa, and the current global pandemic, epitomize the interdependence of human beings and life networks in which they live. Nature sends us a message (http://www.worldenvironnementday.gobal/). Tel: +221 77 497 73 21 Website: http://www.leadsenegal.org/ Email: info@leadsenegal.org Facebook:@senegalead Twitter: @SenegalLead
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  • SAVE SOUTH AFRICA'S WILD COAST FROM OIL DRILLING
    KwaZulu-Natal is renowned for its famous and beautiful beaches. However, healthy oceans are critically important to marine life and to coastal communities whose economies rely on tourism, fishing and recreational activities. Last year, mineral resources minister Gwede Mantashe announced that SA will relax a moratorium on gas and oil exploration licences, implemented earlier in 2018, to allow exploration and production applications already in the system to be granted. Opening up new offshore areas to drilling, risks permanent damage to our oceans and beaches. We've already witnessed the harmful effect of oil on the ocean in July - after fuel tank valves from the MV Chrysanthi S were not properly closed, which lead to an overspill in Port Elizabeth, affecting 90 African penguins! Read more - - https://southcoastherald.co.za/300531/opposing-oil-gas-exploration-awareness-workshop-held-sheppie-july-10/ - https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2018-12-02-activists-vow-to-prevent-exploration-for-oil-and-gas-off-kwazulu-natal-coast/ - https://www.iol.co.za/capetimes/news/seabirds-rescued-after-oil-spill-released-back-into-wild-32613282
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  • Stop U.S. Dumping Plastic in Senegal
    It has only been a year since the United States began exporting their plastic waste to Senegal, and already it has sent over 1 million kilograms of waste. Ever since China’s ban, the United States has started dumping their waste in several developing nations around the world. But, we cannot allow it to make Africa it’s dumping ground. We already have our own plastic crisis to deal with - which poses a major health risk to ordinary people. Of the plastic that exists, only 9 percent has ever been recycled, so the United States' waste ending up in Senegal is likely to stay. Do not be bullied into putting the health of the Senegalese people at risk. Protect our future by refusing to accept their waste. The dignity of our people is at risk. We need strong leadership to protect us. READ MORE - https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jun/17/recycled-plastic-america-global-crisis?CMP=share_btn_tw https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/photography/senegal-west-africa-plastic-waste-crisis-pollution-dakar-a8867451.html https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jun/17/recycled-plastic-america-global-crisis
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  • Ban The Butt in South Africa
    Cigarette butts are the most commonly discarded type of litter globally and are the most frequent item of litter picked up on beaches and other water bodies worldwide. In South Africa cigarette butts continue to be the third most common item of litter found on beaches during clean-ups. Around 23.49 billion cigarettes are consumed in South Africa each year (NIDS, 2015), with global evidence showing that the majority of these are not thrown away in a waste bin (www.cigwaste.org). Of particular environmental concern is the fact that the filters used in cigarettes are not bio-degradable because they are made out of cellulose acetate - a form of plastic. They can take months or even years to break down into smaller pieces of plastic but will not biodegrade. The tobacco remnant is biodegradable because it’s made from plant material, but is still poisonous to humans, animals, aquatic organisms and the environment (Tobacco and its environmental impacts, World Health Organisation Report, 2017). Cigarettes do not need to have a filter because they are not healthier for the smoker – they only make cigarettes less harsh to smoke and therefore taste better, increasing the risk of addiction. Cigarette butts seep chemicals and toxins such as nicotine, arsenic and heavy metals into the water and land, contaminating it long after the cigarette has been smoked and the butt thrown away. A recent study showed that half of the fish left in both fresh and salt water polluted with cigarette butts died as a result of this exposure, even though the cigarette butts had only been in the water for 96 hours (Tobacco and its environmental impacts, World Health Organisation Report, 2017). In Cape Town alone, more than 300 kg of cigarette butts thrown into bins are collected by cleaners each month. This is just a small fraction of the hundreds of kilograms of cigarette butts that city officials say are thrown on the ground (Keep it Clean Campaign). In line with the polluter pays principle, tobacco companies that produce cigarettes need to take responsibility for the collection and appropriate disposal of cigarette butts, and not shift this responsibility to municipalities, and the taxpayer as they currently do. References Africa Labour and Development Research Unit. National Income Dynamics Study 2017, Wave 5 [dataset]. Version 1.0.0 Pretoria: Department of Planning, Monitoring, and Evaluation [funding agency]. Cape Town: Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit [implementer], 2018. Cape Town: DataFirst [distributor], 2018. https://doi.org/10.25828/fw3h-v708 https://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/703/186811.html https://www.iol.co.za/capetimes/news/keepitclean-it-costs-r30-000-per-day-to-keep-cape-town-clean-20946460 https://www.cigwaste.org https://www.getaway.co.za/travel-news/cigarette-butts-cause-more-damage-than-plastic-straws/ https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Local/UD-News/top-pollutants-on-beaches-20190220 World Health Organisation, Tobacco and its environmental impacts Report, World Health Organisation, Geneva, 2017.
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  • Protect Cape Town's Rivers from Pollution
    Tons of Illegal dumping means that during heavy rains plastic, animal carcasses, TV's, hazardous medical waste such as syringes etc. wash down the river into the ocean, as well as ending up on our beaches. At least eight citizen-led groups who are involved in regular clean-ups along these rivers, have observed the following statistics: • 250 big black bags of waste is removed from Liesbeek River every month. • The volume of 70 big black bags of waste flows down the Black River and into the sea every day. • A small clean-up team in Muizenberg collects approx. 160 big bags full per month. These rates are increasing every month. See more photographs here: The City's river cleaning efforts are few & far between. The problem is escalating out of control. Furthermore, it has become clear that small-scale localised clean-ups are not enough - these are simply the plasters on a big festering wound. We need the City to intervene with large-scale strategy and intervention. We call on the City of Cape Town to review and enforce existing bylaws and to set up a specialised unit dedicated to solving the problem. Steps to be taken urgently: 1) Make cleaning , repair and maintenance of Cape Town's river and canal system an operational priority with an appropriate and sufficient budget. 2) Make keeping the rivers and canals clean a mandatory council obligation, using all available resources via: i) Bobcats and cranes ii) EPWP programme employees iii) Installation, construction and maintenance of effective litter traps and nets where appropriate. 3) Prevent access to the canals for tippers and dumpers by installing appropriate fencing or bollards. 4) Install CCTV cameras at known dumping hotspots. 5) Employ the full force of the law to prosecute and punish offenders and impound vehicles, as per existing bylaws. 6) Provide adequate litter and refuse collection services for Cape Town's exploding and burgeoning population, particularly in informally-populated areas. 7) Create a campaign to educate communities about the consequences of illegal dumping and river pollution. Please sign and share this petition. Every voice counts! To join our clean up teams in different areas please email me on : rivercleanupteam@gmail.com Facebook Page: Plastic Pollution Initiative Website: https://riversinsouthafrica.wixsite.com/plasticpollution
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  • Ban Styrofoam, Plastic Cutlery and Straws in Mauritius!
    Plastic and styrofoam can take 500 years to biodegrade in the ocean. Nearly every bit of plastic ever created still exists. It’s toxic, never goes away, and is piling up in our landfills and oceans.  So the less we can use, the better. Recycling is too late. An article in the independent last month states "Recycling is an easy cop-out for governments and large corporations, but the truth is that we have to take very different action if we want to stop irreversibly poisoning the planet." Popular pressure will push governments to adopt and implement strict measures on single use plastic, which is one of the biggest environmental problems we face today. The CNN article continues: "We can do much better. Immediate steps are needed. Governments and economists must act to address the recent collapse in markets for recycled plastic; production and recycling must become inextricably linked in a circular economy." Styrofoam containers, plastic cutlery and straws are typically used no more than an hour or two and then sit in landfills for hundreds of years. They are the epitome of consumerism. Refuse them. Billions of styrofoam coffee cups and containers are thrown each year. Even paper cups are lined with plastic. Disposable cutlery and straws are among the worst plastic pollution culprits. Like plastic bags and bottles, they’re used just once, for a few minutes, and then thrown away to stay decades on Earth. Pledge to yourself never to use a straw again. Please sign our petition today to help take Mauritius to the next level, after banning plastic bags four years ago, and join growing worldwide action by banning replaceable or unnecessary plastic products including styrofoam products, plastic cutlery and straws. Footnotes 1 Single-use or disposable plastics are commonly used for packaging and include items intended to be used only once before they are thrown away or recycled.  https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/25496/singleUsePlastic_sustainability.pdf?isAllowed=y&sequence=1  2 https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/10/every-minute-one-garbage-truck-of-plastic-is-dumped-into-our-oceans/  3 https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/19/more-plastic-than-fish-in-the-sea-by-2050-warns-ellen-macarthur  4 https://www.westerncape.gov.za/general-publication/plastic-pollution  5 https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-44579422
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    Created by Vandana Nathoo
  • RSA: Ban Single-Use Plastics
    The equivalent of one garbage truck of plastic (2) enters our oceans every minute and by 2050, there will be more plastic by weight in the ocean than fish (3). More than one million bags are used every minute worldwide - and around half are used just once before being thrown away. Every plastic bag is used for only 15 minutes on average - but it can take up to 500 years to decompose (4). Plastic is killing marine animals and seabirds (5), destroying the marine environment as well as people’s livelihoods, infiltrating the human food chain and causing cancers and birth defects. Scientists have found plastic in tap water and even in salt and beer. (6) Currently South Africa ranks as one of the worst offenders in mismanaging its plastic waste. (7) South Africans use 8 billion plastic shopping bags per year - and a plastic carrier bag levy introduced in 2003 has failed to have a meaningful impact. (8) By contrast, 28 African countries (9) such as Kenya, Rwanda, Morocco and Cameroon have banned the use, manufacture, importation and distribution of disposable plastic bags. Plastic debris not only results in high cleaning-up costs but also brings huge losses for the tourism, fisheries and shipping industries. It threatens our health, constitutional rights, water resources and climate. Please sign our petition today to help turn SA from a laggard in preventing plastic pollution into a world leader in producing and using sustainable alternatives. This petition will be delivered to the top four political parties' (10) representatives in parliament. Yours sincerely The Cape Town Greenpeace Volunteers, African Climate Reality Project (ACRP), South African Faith Communities Environment Institute (SAFCEI), Fossil Free South Africa, Extinction Rebellion, Wild Rescue, Transparenci, Easy Eco, Green Anglicans, Shop Zero, the Durban Greenpeace Volunteers, Ocean Pledge and the thousands of concerned citizens who have added their signatures. #bansingleuseplasticSA #ProtectTheOceans Footnotes – 1 Single-use or disposable plastics are commonly used for packaging and include items intended to be used only once before they are thrown away or recycled. https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/25496/singleUsePlastic_sustainability.pdf?isAllowed=y&sequence=1 2 https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/10/every-minute-one-garbage-truck-of-plastic-is-dumped-into-our-oceans/ 3 https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/19/more-plastic-than-fish-in-the-sea-by-2050-warns-ellen-macarthur 4 https://www.westerncape.gov.za/general-publication/plastic-pollution 5 https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-44579422 6 A study found that 83% of tap water worldwide is contaminated with plastic micro-fibres. Another discovered that some 73% out of 233 deep water fish from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean had ingested plastic particles. 7 South Africa is currently ranked 11th in the world for mismanaged plastic waste. https://www.iswa.org/fileadmin/user_upload/Calendar_2011_03_AMERICANA/Science-2015-Jambeck-768-71__2_.pdf 8 https://econrsa.org/papers/p_papers/pp18.pdf 9 Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, South Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda and Zambia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase-out_of_lightweight_plastic_bags 10 African National Congress, Democratic Alliance, Economic Freedom Fighters and Inkatha Freedom Party currently hold 10 seats or more in the National Assembly. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Assembly_of_South_Africa
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  • Dispensing in plastic bags - Dis-chem’s unhealthy waste injustice
    Only 10% of all the pastic ever produced has actually been recycled. The other 90% is either floating in the ocean or on the ocean floors, in landfills or burnt. Little plastic bags like they dispense as well as the plastic cable ties are not plastics that are going to be recycled much. Even though it's made from 100% recycled plastic, this product will very unlikely ever be recycled again. Recycling alone is not an effective and long-term solution to the ever growing pandemic of plastic waste that is ending up in our precious oceans and on our beautiful shores.
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    Created by Paul Christison
  • Defend Cape Town Water - Protect our Floodplain
    We are appealing for the protection of The Two Rivers Urban Park (TRUP) so that developers do not build a massive Canal Walk-type mixed-use residential and business park right on top of the floodplain. Plans for the development show that a one-storey high concrete base will need to be laid on top of the flood plain to support the structures above. Members of the TRUP group received from City lawyers, 13 individual emails containing information of Appeals lodged by two Western Cape Government departments: Transport and Public Works and Cultural Affairs and Sport against Western Cape Heritage’s protection of this site. The Two Rivers Urban Park is home to the critically endangered Western Leopard Toad and other endangered birds. We must protect our green areas and water sources. By putting concrete or paving over them, we lose valuable water in water systems and increase our risks for drought and global warming. This can turn our once green city into a desert. We lose more rain and we lose beautiful and diverse wildlife that frequent this area. The science can be found here: https://vimeo.com/257042172 With Cape Town set to increase in temperature by 1.5 degrees Celsius in projected climate change applications, we need to protect green areas and preserve trees and water systems. The more concrete we lay over green areas, the hotter our city becomes. We have crossed the planetary boundary of change and loss in biodiversity. 1 out 4 birds are endangered; 1 out of 4 mammals are endangered; 1 out of 3 amphibians are endangered. This is a core boundary in the system meaning it affects other global processes. https://www.stockholmresilience.org/research/planetary-boundaries/planetary-boundaries/about-the-research/the-nine-planetary-boundaries.html Cape Town's wealth is in its biodiversity, its greenery and its wildlife. For more information: https://trup.org.za https://www.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/western-cape/r4bn-redevelopment-for-cts-river-club-2055324 https://www.capetown.gov.za/city-connect/have-your-say/land-use-applications/70396369
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    Created by Aimee Hoppe